Young woman hair up cabinet card P H Rice Worcester MA

October 6, 2014 - Comment

Successor to Fitton, 311 Main St. Listing protocol: Subject / Type of Photo / Photographer or Studio / City & State / Date, if known. Cabinet card: a variously-sized paper print mounted on a 4 1/4 x 6 1/2″ card. . Introduced in the 1860s, cabinet cards superseded the carte de visite. Their larger size

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(as of April 20, 2020 2:41 am UTC - Details)

Successor to Fitton, 311 Main St. Listing protocol: Subject / Type of Photo / Photographer or Studio / City & State / Date, if known. Cabinet card: a variously-sized paper print mounted on a 4 1/4 x 6 1/2″ card. . Introduced in the 1860s, cabinet cards superseded the carte de visite. Their larger size and greater detail made them more attractive and suitable for display or in albums. The format was common until about 1900. Early cabinet cards typically used albumen prints, although a variety of other processes were used for later cards. The photograph is usually smaller than the card, leaving approximately a half inch at the bottom, where the name of the photographer or studio was printed. Each decade of the cabinet card had its own characteristic studio accessories, when used for full-figure images: 1860’s – balustrade, column and curtain 1870’s – rustic bridge and stile 1880’s – hammock, swing and railway carriage 1890’s – palm trees, cockatoos (usually stuffed specimens) and bicycles 1900’s – the motor car Dimensions given, if any, are approximate. Scans large to show any defects. Unseen defects described. Item complete as issued unless otherwise stated. VG or better condition.

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